Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes

Collection of top 16 famous quotes about Neil Gaiman Sandman Death

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Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes By William Shakespeare: Shall I compare you to a summer's day?You Shall I compare you to a summer's day?
You are more lovely and milder,
Rough winds shake the sweet buds of May,
A summer is way to short. — William Shakespeare
Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes By Ralph Waldo Emerson: The task ahead of us is never as The task ahead of us is never as great as the power behind us. — Ralph Waldo Emerson
Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes By Peter Drucker: Unless a decision has degenerated into work, it Unless a decision has degenerated into work, it is not a decision; it is at best a good intention. — Peter Drucker
Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes By Neil Gaiman: But we do not need to recount every But we do not need to recount every sermon and eulogy. After all, you were there. — Neil Gaiman
Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes By William Arthur Ward: Today is a most unusual day, because we Today is a most unusual day, because we have never lived it before; we will never live it again; it is the only day we have. — William Arthur Ward
Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes By Neil Gaiman: I must confess, I have always wondered what I must confess, I have always wondered what lay beyond life, my dear.
Yeah, everybody wonders. And sooner or later everybody gets to find out. — Neil Gaiman
Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes By Cassandra Clare: Do you think she'll catch him before he Do you think she'll catch him before he gets to the hall?"
"My mom's spent her whole life chasing me around," Clary said. "She moves fast. — Cassandra Clare
Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes By Neil Gaiman: How would you feel about life if Death How would you feel about life if Death was your older sister? — Neil Gaiman
Neil Gaiman Sandman Death Quotes By Ian McEwan: The cost of oblivious daydreaming was always this The cost of oblivious daydreaming was always this moment of return, the realignment with what had been before and now seemed a little worse. — Ian McEwan